Blog Archives

Another Pop-psych Myth Bites the Dust (statistically speaking)

Men and Women May Not Be So Different After All

According to a new article at PsychCentral —

“Despite considerable popular literature suggesting a vast psychological difference between men and women, a new study suggests that gender differences are relatively insignificant.

“Researchers studied a comprehensive list of characteristics ranging from empathy and sexuality to science inclination and extroversion. Overall, they performed a statistical analysis of 122 different traits involving 13,301 individuals.

“Their findings rebuke prior studies that suggested character traits often vary by gender.

“In the new study, the scientists were able to show that statistically, men and women do not fall into different groups. In other words, no matter how strange and mysterious your partner may seem, their gender is probably only a small part of the problem.”

See the full article . . . (really, you should).

and, here’s the original feed from the University of Rochester.

_______

Op.Ed.: Old Wine in New Bottles Dept.

Hey, Dr. Mars, maybe that game of yours on how to manipulate each other was
actually written 48 years ago, and we we are all just Earthlings out for a spin. Shocking.

You are when you eat.


Ask a few four-year-olds whether they want ONE marshmallow now, or TWO if they can wait just a little while.

Then let the fun begin

The marshmallow experiment is a famous test conducted by Walter Mischel at Stanford University and discussed by Daniel Goleman in his popular work. In the 1960s, a group of four-year olds were given a marshmallow and promised another, only if they could wait 20 minutes before eating the first one. Some children could wait and others could not. The researchers then followed the progress of each child into adolescence, and demonstrated that those with the ability to wait were better adjusted and more dependable (determined via surveys of their parents and teachers), and scored an average of 210 points higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.

And many more . . .

And, of course, the version for mature audiences